Cookie Policy Privacy Policy

Things I love: Glerups slippers

Things I love: Glerups slippers

When you work from home and have a small child, it feels like 80% of your life is spent inside your house. Especially as autumn descends. Between living in converted Victorian terrace houses, warehouses and timber-frame apartment buildings, a building with a concrete floor – good slippers are critical in my daily life. And now that I live in Germany, it is absolutely standard practice to wear Hausschuhe (literally house shoes) inside at all times. When you visit someone, they will have a basket of loaner Hausschuhe as well!

The hunt for the best slippers

You laugh, but I probably wear my slippers for more time out of the day than any pair of shoes. A good pair of inside house shoes is critical to my happiness. Sick of drugstore fuzzy landlord lady ones, cheap ones from Muji that never stay on, more expensive but equally crap ones from a department store, I decided to do some research. There had to be a solution.

Scandi felted wool lovelies

Behold, my perfect slippers: Glerups.

Glerups shoe shape and leather soleGlerups boot slipperGlerups with rubber sole
image courtesy of Glerups

These Danish felted wool beauties come in several variations – a slip-on clog shape, a slip-on shoe with heel coverage and an ankle boot, all with suede soles. The shoe version has an optional rubber sole, which is the kind I ordered. I love the thick felt, and how warm they are. The rubber sole means I can pop out my front door without worrying about ruining my slippers or finding a proper pair of shoes. And they look quite sleek – no fuzzy pompoms or bunny ears here. Not only that, these are made by workers who are paid a decent wage, and the wool is carefully sourced too.

Investment in a sustainable, responsibly made indoor shoe

They are not cheap, I know the concept of spending over $80 on slippers feels crazy, but these will last forever. I wear mine more hours out of the day than any of my shoes, so it seemed logical. I bought my pair last winter, and with daily wear they are nearly unchanged. Perfect. An update: they lasted for nearly four years, and eventually wore out the heel entirely. But most importantly, animal welfare is an important part of Glerups’ business model, as is responsible employment of their workers. Glerups slippers are made in the EU (in Romania, in fact) and you can watch a few videos on how the slippers come together. Some of the wool comes from farms in New Zealand now, but these farmers also take special care of their sheep.

Glerups are available through their Canadian website, in the US on Amazon, and in Europe on Amazon.

This post was originally written in October 2013, updated in February 2021.

Follow:

The convertible shoe Kickstarter you’ve got to check out

The convertible shoe Kickstarter you’ve got to check out

I’ve been keeping my eye on this German start-up for awhile now. I love the concept – shoes with a heel you can switch out from high to low. Much less bulky than bringing an entirely separate pair with you (and what do you do with your other pair even if a pair of flats can roll up small, your other shoes won’t!). Mime et Moi make some incredibly cool convertible sandals, from heels to flats.

Up until recently, you couldn’t get these shipped outside of Europe, but now Mime et Moi have a Kickstarter up and you can get them shipped anywhere! I particularly love the block heel options.

I’ve got my eye on some practical black Nappa leather ones, though my heart is clamouring for the dalmatian spot ones.

Which ones would you pick??

All images courtesy Mime et Moi. 

Follow:

Travelling to Germany: Books to Get You in the Mood

Travelling to Germany: Books to Get You in the Mood

Before I travel somewhere (or move there!), I like to get myself in the mood, atmospherically. This may seem excessive to some, but I read a lot, so transitioning my reading list to focus more on where I’m going adds a lot to my trip.

I have a few history books in my list, but not guidebooks. This is all about getting the feel for a place.

[amazon_image id=”B00358VI2I” link=”true” target=”_blank” size=”medium” ]The Treasure Chest: Unexpected Reunion and Other Stories (Penguin Classics)[/amazon_image]

The Treasure Chest, Johann Peter Hebel

Imagine Reader’s Digest-type stories from the early 19th century, but all centred on the southwest corner of Germany. The Treasure Chest is a collection of Hebel’s fables originally written to accompany a Lutheran calendar sold in the region. Some are funny, some are clearly meant to impart a moral, and some are just ridiculous, but it’s an easy read that brings to life some of these Black Forest villages you see out the train window.

[amazon_image id=”B00LGUF0F8″ link=”true” target=”_blank” size=”medium” ]Red Love: The Story of an East German Family[/amazon_image]

 
Red Love: The Story of an East German Family, Maxim Leo

This is a very personal story of East Germany, and how different family members managed their relationship to the state. The author digs back in his own family’s history to pull apart the narratives of his socialist hero grandfather, his journalist mother, and his artist father. It’s the first book I’ve read that really conveys the feeling of building a new world that infused the early days of the GDR after the war, and it’s fascinating to watch it go to pieces through the prism of these small stories.

[amazon_image id=”014044503X” link=”true” target=”_blank” size=”medium” ]The Sorrows of Young Werther[/amazon_image]

The Sorrows of Young Werther, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

You’re going to Germany, you have to read some Goethe. I kind of love Young Werther for all its moping around, hand-on-forehead draping moodiness. The landscape descriptions are lovely, and give you a real sense of the pastoral scenes Germans of the 18th century were so enamoured with. Goethe loved the ruins of my local schloss in Heidelberg, so I admit I have a fondness for him no matter what.

[amazon_image id=”0006511260″ link=”true” target=”_blank” size=”medium” ]Royal Flash (The Flashman Papers, Book 2)[/amazon_image]

Royal Flash, George MacDonald Fraser

Now I recommend Flashman books with a very huge caveat, which is that while they are enjoyable to a certain extent, the average woman’s role in these books is terrible. Fraser wrote the screenplay for Octopussy, so that should give you an idea of what I’m trying to get at. However, this one covers Flashman’s mixup with Bismarck and delves into some interesting North German and Danish history.

[amazon_image id=”0312680686″ link=”true” target=”_blank” size=”medium” ]Germania: In Wayward Pursuit of Germans and Their History[/amazon_image]

Germania: In Wayward Pursuit of the Germans and their History, Simon Winder

This rambling sort-of history is a good overview of the different regions in Germany, and some of the history that makes the country what it is today. I found the author’s occasionally smug, self-important Britishness a bit much sometimes, but he is quite funny. It’s clear, particularly by the end of the book, that he has a great fondness for the country.

[amazon_image id=”0746098545″ link=”true” target=”_blank” size=”medium” ]Illustrated Grimm’s Fairy Tales[/amazon_image]

Illustrated Grimm’s Fairy Tales

This one is a great for kids coming along on a German adventure. The Brothers Grimm collected folklore in the early 19th century, and grew up in southwestern Germany. They were influenced by Johann Peter Hebel’s stories, and you can see the parallels in their description of little villages, naughty cobblers, recalcitrant blacksmiths, and so on.

I’ve made you a lovely image, so you can pin this post for later.

Germany Book collage

*This post contains affiliate links, for which I get a small percentage if you click on one and buy something, at no cost to you. I thank you for helping to support this blog.

 

Follow:

Nine stylish camera bags. No really.

Beautiful Studio Lei Momi satchel in yellow, image courtesy Studio Lei Momi

I’ve started bringing my DSLR with me more these days, and my Cambridge Satchel Company habit is not compatible. I have a little Crumpler camera bag that sort of works, but the strap is too short and I find it difficult to get in and out of. So, I am on the hunt for a nice-looking, simple bag that will fit my camera safely, and will also fit in my bike basket.

Impossible? I hope not. When I started googling this, I kept coming up with really frilly looking ‘women’s camera bags’ with pointless flowers on them. Do we need to review why camera bags don’t need to be gendered, and they don’t need to involve frills and unnecessary zipper pulls? *sigh* It’s nearly as bad as diaper bags and bicycle panniers.

This is an on-the-go, everyday kind of camera bag I’m looking for – no extra lenses or anything. Most of the companies I mention make camera bags specifically, and they have options for those of you toting more kit than I do.

So here’s my list of stylish camera bags that don’t scream CAMERA BAG. Any suggestions? I’d love to hear them in the comments below. This first ONA bag is the priciest of the lot, so don’t despair, there’s more below!

ONA

I’ve seen these around for awhile, and while they are beautiful, they are also very pricey. Still, I hear they last forever.

The Brooklyn €534

ONA brooklyn-black-frontONA brooklyn-black-interior

The Palma €388

ONA palma_black_sideONA palma inside

Johansen

I had only seen people link to Johansen bags that looked too fiddly for me so I hadn’t investigated further. Silly me, they make some gorgeous simple ones too. I am seriously lusting after the Sienna, but I’m not really a brown bag person – I reckon I could make an exception. If they make it in oxblood or black, I’m in serious trouble. I think I’d go for the Granada though, affordable and simple.

The Sienna $179 USD

Jobags sienamainJObags sienainterior

The Granada $99 USD

Jobags granadamain

Jobags granadablack2

Cheeky Lime

Most the shapes here didn’t really work for me, but their satchel in cherry red was the exception. I love that it has detachable backpack straps, because satchel backpacks make me weak in the knees.

Locho Satchel $129.95 USD

Cheeky Lime Loko satchelCheeky Lime Loko inside

Studio Lei Momi

I dipped into Etsy for this one, as I’ve had good luck with Etsy bags. This one is faux leather, which I appreciate for its affordability and protection from rain. The yellow is lovely too – I have several yellow satchels and love them dearly, particularly in grey February.

Alice in Summer bag €117.02

Studio LeMomi satchelStudio Le Momi inside

Pompidoo

European and lovely, Pompidoo has some gorgeous leather options. Again, pricey. But… so pretty. The Geneva below also comes in a beautiful grey.

Geneva €240

Pompidoo GenevaPompidoo geneva inside

Tokyo €290

Pompidoo TokyoPompidoo Tokyo inside

GATTA

I just discovered this bag through Instagram, and I think this is my new favourite of the lot. The black one goes fast, so preorder is the way to go. I am so tempted by the pink though… gah!

Lola $149 USD

gatta outside

So which one would I choose? If budget wasn’t an issue, I think I’d go for either of the Pompidoo bags. For affordability? I think I’d go with the Johansen Granada bag. What about you?

Note: all prices are correct at time of writing, all images belong to their respective companies.

Follow:

Dress season

Dress season

IMG_1092

For some reason, this seems to be a sensitive subject, but that’s a bit silly, so let’s get real. For those of us with thighs that are friendly with each other, summer can be a bit painful. However, I’ve blissfully lived in dresses and skirts for the past couple of hot seasons with help from some underwear discoveries.
jockies slipshorts

Everyday wear: Jockeys Slipshort Skimmies

I have about five pairs of these. They come in ‘Cooling’ which functions a bit like sports stay-dry. Go for mid-length ones, the short ones don’t offer much in the way of chafing prevention. These are not shapewear, but they are super comfy and won’t leave weird lumpy bits where the shorts begin and end. They go on sale fairly regularly, so keep your eyes peeled.

triumph high waisted

Support: Triumph Highwaist Second Skin Sensation

I’ve had a pair of these for many years, and the elastic has stood the test of time. It prevents nasty chafing and gives you a bit of holding in around the tummy and waist. It’s not Spanx level constriction by any means, more of a medium level of support. Perfect for those days you don’t want to work up a sweat wrestling your way into serious shapewear.

So break out those dresses and do some twirling.

Follow: