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Packing List for Germany: Spring Edition

Packing List for Germany: Spring Edition

Different cities have different styles, but if you’re looking for what to wear in Germany, this post will get you started so you’re prepared for our variable spring weather, and don’t immediately stand out as a tourist.

Spring is a tough season to pack for when you’re heading on a multi-city trip through Germany. I find it hard to dress for and I live here! Go for layering and be realistic about your planned activities. Above all, be ready to walk

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Don’t wear yoga pants

Gym clothes are for the gym – you won’t find people wearing yoga trousers unless they have literally just finished a class, and even then, they will change before going out on the street. This goes triply so for sweatpants. Try a relaxed pair of flowy trousers or more structured yet stretchy ponte if you’re looking for comfort. A dark pair of slim or skinny jeans, a nice top and a cardigan, with a scarf thrown over the top, will do well in any German city. I have joked with my husband there is a German Dad uniform on the weekends: chinos in a dark colour, t-shirt or collared shirt, and a v-neck jumper on top. Seriously, I saw every single dad dressed like this in a Frankfurt museum the other day. 

Outerwear

Spring is a changeable season everywhere, and if you’re planning on visiting Berlin or Munich, be ready for wind. A good trench coat, ideally with a water resistant or waterproof coating, will be your best friend, and it works well layered with a sweater or cardigan. It looks equally nice on top of jeans as a nice dress when you’re heading out for dinner. This is where I find more technical rain coats fall down – you want to go to a nice restaurant, but Gortex just doesn’t fit the bill. Unless you’re planning a serious hiking holiday (in which case you’ll need other clothes anyway), bring a trench or another nice wind and rain resistant jacket. 

Universal Standard Trench
Universal Standard Trench
Guess Trench Coat
Guess Trench Coat
Ted Baker Contrast Trim Trench
Ted Baker Contrast Trim Trench
Via Spiga Water Repellent Trench
Via Spiga Water Repellent Trench
M&S Stormwear Trench
M&S Stormwear Trench
Universal Standard Trench
Universal Standard Trench
Guess Trench Coat
Guess Trench Coat
Ted Baker Contrast Trim Trench
Ted Baker Contrast Trim Trench
Via Spiga Water Repellent Trench
Via Spiga Water Repellent Trench
M&S Stormwear Trench
M&S Stormwear Trench
Universal Standard Trench
Universal Standard Trench
Guess Trench Coat
Guess Trench Coat
Ted Baker Contrast Trim Trench
Ted Baker Contrast Trim Trench
Via Spiga Water Repellent Trench
Via Spiga Water Repellent Trench
M&S Stormwear Trench
M&S Stormwear Trench

Scarves

A few good scarfs, from silk to lightweight knit, will fill in the gaps when the weathers takes you by surprise. They take up practically no space in your luggage (I like to shove mine into my shoes) and it makes any outfit that bit more sophisticated. Wear it in your hair, pull it around your shoulders when you’re on an open-top bus tour, tie it to your bag for a pop of colour, sleep under it on a long train journey – I love a good scarf or three when traveling. You will see everyone in Germany wearing scarves in all weathers – men and women.

Wrap scarf
Wrap scarf
Crinkle linen scarf
Crinkle linen scarf
Lightweight woven scarf
Lightweight woven scarf
Mulberry silk scarf
Mulberry silk scarf
Wrap scarf
Wrap scarf
Crinkle linen scarf
Crinkle linen scarf
Lightweight woven scarf
Lightweight woven scarf
Mulberry silk scarf
Mulberry silk scarf
Wrap scarf
Wrap scarf
Crinkle linen scarf
Crinkle linen scarf
Lightweight woven scarf
Lightweight woven scarf
Mulberry silk scarf
Mulberry silk scarf

Shoes

You will be walking everywhere, so bring sensible shoes, everyone says. Yes well, sensible doesn’t have to mean ginormous gym shoes. You’re in luck, because The Thing over here for several seasons has been crisp white trainers with anything. I personally love my Italian Supergra hightops, but any low-profile white trainer will do the trick. The second most ubiquitous shoe choice are sleek ankle boots, and these are also easy to find in seriously comfortable options. I love my Blundstones, and wear them everywhere… they are fully waterproof, slip on easily, and with a little polish look good as new no matter what I throw at them. 

Blundstones heeled
Blundstones Chelsea boot fancy
Blundstones Chelsea boot
Supergra hightop trainer
Supergra low-rise trainer
Blundstones heeled
Blundstones Chelsea boot fancy
Blundstones Chelsea boot
Supergra hightop trainer
Supergra low-rise trainer
Blundstones heeled
Blundstones Chelsea boot fancy
Blundstones Chelsea boot
Supergra hightop trainer
Supergra low-rise trainer
Tübingen
The picturesque riverside in Tübingen

Dresses

I am a dress and cardigan woman through and through, but I truly believe it’s one of the easiest travel outfits ever. Even in spring. From March to June, spring in Europe can be variable, so be pack for cooler temperatures and a few warm days too. Bring several pairs of leggings to wear underneath and you’ll be fine. I personally prefer leggings to tights for daytime wear, as I find them more breathable and forgiving over a long day. I just tuck a pair of black socks on under black leggings, and with ankle boots, honestly no one notices. A good midi dress with a cardigan, leggings, ankle boots, trench coat, and scarf can take you pretty much anywhere looking put together and feeling super comfortable. It turns hot in the afternoon? Whip off those leggings or the cardigan. The wind picks up? Do up your cardigan and coat, wrap the scarf around your shoulders for an extra layer. 

Joanie Cardigan
Joanie Cardigan
Joanie Rabbit print dress
Joanie Rabbit print dress
Karen Kane Shirtdress
Karen Kane Shirtdress
Bomber Jacket
Bomber Jacket
Universal Standard Geneva dress
Universal Standard Geneva dress
Tshirt dress
Tshirt dress
Joanie Cardigan
Joanie Cardigan
Joanie Rabbit print dress
Joanie Rabbit print dress
Karen Kane Shirtdress
Karen Kane Shirtdress
Bomber Jacket
Bomber Jacket
Universal Standard Geneva dress
Universal Standard Geneva dress
Tshirt dress
Tshirt dress
Joanie Cardigan
Joanie Cardigan
Joanie Rabbit print dress
Joanie Rabbit print dress
Karen Kane Shirtdress
Karen Kane Shirtdress
Bomber Jacket
Bomber Jacket
Universal Standard Geneva dress
Universal Standard Geneva dress
Tshirt dress
Tshirt dress

Bags

I am not a fan of daypacks. I know they are practical, but they look huge, and when you’re going in and out of museums, squeezing onto busy public transport, and walking down small streets, they are a pain to you and to everyone else around you. Stick with a practical crossbody bag or messenger bag. It’s easier to keep it in eyesight in case of pick-pockets, and easier to access. Honestly, a small water bottle you can refill, your camera, your phone, your wallet, tissues, a snack bar, a lipstick, keys, plasters – there’s not much else you need for a day out. Take advantage of my search for stylish camera bags right here.

Shoulder camera bag
Vintage looking camera bag
Johansen Siena Camera Bag
Cambridge Satchel Company Traveller Bag
Jo Totes Camera backpack
Shoulder camera bag
Vintage looking camera bag
Johansen Siena Camera Bag
Cambridge Satchel Company Traveller Bag
Jo Totes Camera backpack
Shoulder camera bag
Vintage looking camera bag
Johansen Siena Camera Bag
Cambridge Satchel Company Traveller Bag
Jo Totes Camera backpack

One-week Spring Germany packing list

  • One shirtdress
  • One super easy jersey dress
  • One sweater dress
  • One midi skirt
  • One pair of stretchy skinny jeans
  • Two cardigans
  • One turtleneck sweater
  • Two t-shirts (I like H&M for these basics)
  • Two pairs of leggings
  • Trench coat
  • Three scarves
  • Two pairs of earrings
  • Two necklaces
  • Cotton underwear
  • Bras
  • Sunglasses
  • Camera bag/cross-body bag
  • One pair ankle boots
  • One pair trainers

Cosmetics and toiletries

I keep my cosmetics pretty streamlined in general, so when I travel there’s nothing really different than my usual routine. I do often opt for make-up remover wipes, and throw a bunch of cotton pads in a zip-top bag with my favourite exfoliator squirted all over them. But that’s it! It’s worth noting that in Germany, most women go for a fresh-faced look with minimal eye makeup and neutral lip colour.

  • Make up (foundation, concealer, mascara, eyeliner, brow pencil)
  • Make-up remover wipes like these
  • Ziptop bag with cotton pads soaked in Pixi Glow Tonic
  • Medicines

Charging infrastructure

This is our family name for all the cables, chargers, and whatnot required to keep everything plugged in and charged while we’re away. Mine is a bit different as I have to bring my CPAP machine with me when I travel, so I bring a surge-protected power bar with built-in USB ports for plugging in my devices. But my husband brings just a plug-in USB charging block, that has the brightest light on it ever, so it functions as a nightlight as well. We’re also adding a couple of universal plug adapters to our infrastructure as well.

Multi-port plug adaptorMulti-port USB plug in blockSurge protected power bar

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Heading to Berlin, Frankfurt, Munich, Hamburg, or Cologne? I've got you covered with a practical packing list for spring time in Germany.

This post was originally published in January 2019, updated in March 2021

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Packing List for Germany: Summer Edition

The impressive palace at Ludwigsburg, an easy day trip from Stuttgart.

This post contains affiliate links. Should you click on one, I will get a small commission at no extra cost to you. 

Summer in Germany is beautiful – it’s all about relaxing in beer gardens, visiting castles, wandering in leafy green forests, and exploring half-timbered towns. There is no real dress code in Germany, but you will find people tend to wear less sportswear than in North America. Here is my local’s guide for what to pack for a trip to Germany.

Heidelberg Castle

What to wear in Germany in the summer

Of course, the weather varies from one end of this large country to the other. If you’re up north in Germany, you can expect temperatures around 17ºC-22ºC (63ºF-68ºF), but down south in near the Black Forest, it gets up to 35º+C (104ºF). When we travel around in Germany in the summer, I pack a capsule wardrobe of dresses, cardigans, leggings, sandals, and scarves, with a packable rain jacket for surprise showers. I am definitely a dress person, and I will let you into my secret for wearing dresses with no tights as a woman whose thighs touch (no matter what size I’ve been, they’ve always done that, just the way I’m built!). I admit I’m pretty minimal when it comes to my colour palette, so most of my clothes are black. This makes it easy to build a small capsule wardrobe though. 

German style is quite straight forward, but you’ll find sportswear is kept to sports activities. Women wear jeans or dresses, with clean white tennis shoes or sandals, make-up and jewellery is not as big a deal as it is in Poland or France, for instance. Men almost always wear shirts with collars, even outside work, and sweaters when it’s cooler. Everyone wears scarves, all the time, unless it’s very, very hot.

Our German travel tends towards historic sites, city visits, museums, markets, and easy forest walks. If you’re doing a lot of serious hiking, your packing list will be a bit different!

Castles on the Rhine

Great travel dresses for summer

I’m always about dresses and cardigan outfits when I travel, and all the time really, but I find it a very versatile way to manage changes in temperature. A lightweight dress in linen or cotton, and a short or long cardigan depending on whether it’s very warm or cooler where you are, covers most eventualities. You look put together and nicely dressed, avoiding the whole sloppy sportswear when not doing sports thing that is a huge tourist stereotype in Europe. Packing a pair or two of leggings makes any of your dresses a great airport outfit, as well as proof against cooler temps without having to pack bulky trousers.

Puff sleeve dress
Free People dress
Floral dress
Snap front cardigan
Maxi dress
Blue pointelle cardigan
Cotton button-through dress
Joanie Potted Plant Dress
Puff sleeve dress
Free People dress
Floral dress
Snap front cardigan
Maxi dress
Blue pointelle cardigan
Cotton button-through dress
Joanie Potted Plant Dress

My secret weapon for wearing dresses and skirts in the summer

Thigh chafing, chub rub, whatever you call it, it can ruin a perfectly nice summer day. I don’t want to wear trousers or jeans when it’s hot out, but I used to suffer through it rather than get that painful burning rash when your thighs rub together. When I discovered anti-chafing shorts though, everything changed! I have tried the fancy lace bands, the creams and sticks, and nothing worked for me until I discovered Jockey Skimmies. There are other options out there for lightweight anti-chafing shorts, but these ones work for me so I don’t mess with a good thing! For really hot summer days, I go with the cooling version. These were a total life changer for me, and I now spend every summer in dresses and skirts! Bonus points for keeping everything decent when the wind blows up your skirt. I’ve linked several versions here, including the plus size ones.

Jockey slipshorts plusJockey slipshorts 2-packJockey skimmies cooling

Scarves are your best friend

On our trip to Italy recently, I brought a couple big yet light scarves. They were such a boon and here’s why: if it’s too hot for a cardigan (it was 40ºC most days) you can tie them to your hat or bag, but when you need to go into a church you can wrap it around your shoulders for the modesty requirements, and in the evenings it cuts the chill. Because these big chiffon scarves are so light, they are easy to manage during the day, and look quite lovely as a hatband, or floating off your purse. My scarves also saved my hair from getting totally wrecked on windy open-top bus tours and boat tours – curly haired folks will know what I’m talking about here for sure! These don’t need to be expensive, there are lots available for $5-$15/€8-€15.

Flower printed lightweight scarf
Chiffon wrap scarf
Patterned lightweight scarf
Chiffon travel scarf
Flower printed lightweight scarf
Chiffon wrap scarf
Patterned lightweight scarf
Chiffon travel scarf
Flower printed lightweight scarf
Chiffon wrap scarf
Patterned lightweight scarf
Chiffon travel scarf
Yes, these are Birkenstocks.

Best walking sandals for travel

I bring two pairs of sandals if I’m traveling in the summer: one pair with a small wedge, and a very flat pair – both are good walking shoes for walking on cobblestones. Both of my sandals are very practical Birkenstocks, but they aren’t their standard styles. I really need a strap behind my ankle in a good walking sandal, so I avoid their slip-on styles, but the cork footbed I find very comfortable over long walking days. The sole is flexible, which is a key thing to look for when walking on old cobblestone streets.

Birkenstock papillo silver
Birkenstock papillo pink
Birkenstock kumba black
Birkenstock Kumba white
Birkenstock papillo silver
Birkenstock papillo pink
Birkenstock kumba black
Birkenstock Kumba white
Birkenstock papillo silver
Birkenstock papillo pink
Birkenstock kumba black
Birkenstock Kumba white

If you’re keen on having a closed toe trainer, I would suggest a stream-lined white or grey shoe that won’t look out of place with summer dresses. Personally I love Italian Supergras, I have a silver hightop pair I love.

Supergra flatform
Supergra grey trainer
Supergra hightop trainer
Supergra low-rise trainer
Supergra flatform
Supergra grey trainer
Supergra hightop trainer
Supergra low-rise trainer
Supergra flatform
Supergra grey trainer
Supergra hightop trainer
Supergra low-rise trainer

The best purse for travel

I am very aware of my belongings, many years of living in a big city like London will do that to you, so I don’t carry money belts or special bags or anything like that. I have never been pickpocketed or had my bag slashed or anything like that in western Europe, I really think these ‘safety travel bags’ are unnecessary. I used to bring too many purses, but I now realize that I will always have my camera bag with me so there’s no point bringing another day bag because I won’t use it. This is why I invested in a camera bag that looks like a regular purse, not one of those hyper-technical things. I wrote a whole post when I was researching a stylish-looking camera bag! I do bring my small laptop backpack if I am bringing my computer, as it allows me to keep all the cables and bits with me, but this generally stays in the hotel most days. If I’m on a train, I will stow my suitcase and then I have my laptop there ready to go with all its bits at my seat. If you’re not bringing a camera bag, I suggest a medium-sized cross body bag so you’ve got your hands free. Though do wear it fashionably pulled forward in front to discourage pickpockets. I don’t suggest a backpack style because many museums, galleries, and other attractions will insist you check it and on public transit it gets in people’s faces.

Cosmetics and toiletries

I keep my cosmetics pretty streamlined in general, so when I travel there’s nothing really different than my usual routine. I do often opt for make-up remover wipes, and throw a bunch of cotton pads in a zip-top bag with my favourite exfoliator squirted all over them. But that’s it!

  • Make up (foundation, concealer, mascara, eyeliner, brow pencil, lipstick) and setting spray! This keeps everything in place all day, I love the spray from MAC
  • Make-up remover wipes like these Neutrogena ones, but honestly any of them will work
  • Ziptop bag with cotton pads soaked in Pixi Glow Tonic – I find this gets rid of the sweaty make-up and sunscreen build up better than anything else
  • Medicines you need plus: painkillers and antihistamine

Charging infrastructure

This is our family name for all the cables, chargers, and whatnot required to keep everything plugged in and charged while we’re away. Mine is a bit different as I have to bring my CPAP machine with me (a device with a mask I need to wear when I sleep, it’s to deal with sleep apnea), so I bring a surge-protected power bar with built-in USB ports for plugging in my devices. But my husband brings just a plug-in USB charging block, that has the brightest light on it ever, so it functions as a nightlight as well. We’re also adding a couple of universal plug adapters to our infrastructure as well.

Multi-port plug adaptorMulti-port USB plug in blockSurge protected power bar

One week Summer Europe packing list

If you’re planning to swim, bring a quick-dry suit, flip flops, and a large quick-dry towel.

  • Three dresses
    • One shirtdress, One sundress, one super easy jersey dress
  • One midi skirt – either plain or a bit flashy, ASOS is a great source for this length. I like midi skirts for travel as they give you more coverage in case you are visiting religious sites, or end up clambering into tour boats, or sitting on stone walls
  • A pair of easy jersey culottes
  • Two cardigans
  • Two t-shirts and a sleeveless top (I like H&M for these basics)
  • Two pairs of leggings
  • Packable rain jacket

For accessories:

Did I miss any of your must-pack items?

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Traveling with a CPAP machine

Traveling with a CPAP machine

A CPAP machine is piece of medical equipment those of us who have sleep apnea use to keep our airways clear while we sleep. It’s not something we can leave behind when we go on vacation. My sleep apnea was diagnosed in 2011, so I have lots of experience of traveling with a CPAP machine. Here are a few things to know when you travel with your machine. 

Prep your CPAP machine for airplane travel

When you’re planning your trip, take stock of your supplies. Do you have a fresh filter, and enough nose pillows? Give your equipment a clean before you go, and empty your humidifier of water and dry it well. Most CPAP machines come with their own travel bag, and if yours doesn’t get a padded one ahead of your trip. You won’t want to pack your machine in your suitcase because if it gets lost or stolen, you will be thoroughly unhappy. Your CPAP won’t count against your carry on allowance as it is medical equipment, and if you want to sleep on the plane, you will want it with you. It’s a good precaution to have a copy of your CPAP prescription with you, but to be honest, I’ve never had anyone ask about it.

Airport security with a CPAP

CPAP machines are very common, and if you start looking around at your fellow passengers at the airport, you’ll start to spot the CPAP travel bags all over the place. Airport security staff are very used to seeing CPAP machines, so you should not have to explain what it is. However! It is totally unpredictable whether you will have to unpack your CPAP machine from its travel bag to go through the X-ray machine or not. Look out for signs, but regardless, ask the official person standing nearest the belt when you are putting your bags in the trays whether they want it out or not. No security person has ever been difficult about it, at most they may want to do that swab test thing where they wipe a wand over the outside of your machine. Even that has only happened to me once. So don’t worry, you won’t have to explain sleep apnea to anyone at security or anything!

Erin at Large reader deal: CPAPMasks.com has kindly offered my readers 20% off orders over $75, just use the code ERIN20 at checkout

Using your CPAP machine on the plane (or train)

Many airlines want 48 hours notice if you would like to use your CPAP on board the aircraft, but again, if you forget this, you will probably be okay – I have never had anyone say anything about it (and I have never remembered to ask). Don’t forget, millions of people have sleep apnea and travel with CPAP machines, so airline and security staff see them all the time. You will want to be sure to have a power adapter with you, and check ahead of time if your seat has a power outlet that will support your machine. You can check Seat Guru for details of your plane layout ahead of time. If you’re traveling by train, you can request information about the best seats to reserve with access to an outlet with the train company. 

If you absolutely have to sleep, your best bet is to have a battery pack for your CPAP machine with you en route. A CPAP travel battery is an investment, but if anything should be delayed, or you don’t have the right adapter when you arrive, it’s nice to know you can sleep properly. Look for the small battery packs if it’s just for the plane or for emergencies.

Tips for getting set up at the hotel

I like to pack a travel power adapter with several outlets and lightning cable slots. This is not a transformer, so you will want to make sure your CPAP machine is dual voltage – it should say on the bottom, or on the big block attached to your power cord. If you’re in doubt, call the manufacturer. However, the vast majority of machines made in the past 10 years are dual voltage and will work fine with a straight power adapter. 

Traveling in Europe particularly, there’s likely to be only one outlet by the side of the bed, and you will have to unplug the lamp to use your CPAP machine. If you have an adapter with lightning cable slots, you will at least be able to charge your phone next to you instead of across the room (such a pain). 

If you’re staying more than one night, make sure to tuck your mask and hose up around your machine, not tangled up in the sheets. If you had to put your machine on the floor, put it on a desk or the nightstand, even if you have to unplug it. Again, hotel housekeeping has seen loads of these before, but make their job easier by storing it neatly. It’s much less likely to get your hose stepped on, kicked or the whole machine dumped on the ground if it is neatly put away without dangling wires or tubes. 

You CAN camp with a CPAP machine

You can wilderness camp with sleep apnea! You will need the right CPAP travel battery for your machine (this is when it’s good to go for the , the right charging infrastructure (a car charger adapter, or just a travel plug adapter), and a bit of a plan. If you’re backpacking, you will want to consider investing in a travel CPAP machine for the weight and size factor. I’ve detailed the options when it comes to travel CPAP machines below. 

Is a travel CPAP machine worth it?

Travel CPAP machines are mini versions of a regular CPAP machine, often doing away with the humidifier. They can be as light as 300g, and the size of a drink can. Sound amazing? I know, it does to me. The downside is the cost, and as we all know, CPAP machines are not cheap, and investing in a second machine just for travel requires some thought. Check with your doctor or sleep apnea specialist to make sure you’re getting one with the right options (auto pressure or not, humidifier or not), but I recommend shopping around once you confirm which model will work for you. 

Some of the travel CPAP machines available:

Transcend Auto Mini CPAP machine
Transcend Auto Mini CPAP machine

The cheapest one I’ve found with good reviews is the Transcend EZEX Mini CPAP machine (check prices), which is a mini CPAP but does not come with a humidifier. You will want to make sure you get the right version for you, the one with auto pressure is more expensive. This one does not come with a humidifier, but you can buy a separate unit. You can also get a travel battery, and even one with a solar charging option. This sounds like the best option for camping.

Respironics DreamStation Portable CPAP machine

The Respironics DreamStation Portable CPAP machine (check prices) is another popular choice for a small, travel CPAP machine, though I wouldn’t put this in the mini CPAP category. The DreamStation has a feature that preheats the water in your humidifier (should you choose to get the attachable one) 30 minutes beforehand, and there’s a smart humidifier setting that measures the humidity in the air and adjusts your humidifier’s output to prevent rainout (that’s when the humidifier is working too hard compared to the moisture in the ambient air, and you end up with water in your hose making crazy noises). 

Resmed Airmini CPAP

The Resmed Airmini CPAP machine is the one I have my eye on. I use a Resmed machine at home, so I’m interested in this one. It has a waterless humidifier, but it’s worth noting that function doesn’t work if you depend on a full-face mask. It weighs only 300g. 

Something to consider is your CPAP cleaning regimen. I am guilty, like so many others, of not cleaning my equipment enough. I really like the look of these little cleaners because they are tiny and you can easily travel with it. However, if you’re already set up with something like the SoClean system at home, a good clean before and after your trips 

I would say, if you travel often for work or have a long trip coming up, a travel or portable CPAP machine is huge. I wouldn’t recommend using a travel machine as your everyday CPAP solution as most of them don’t include humidifiers as standard. You’ll want to stay with a full-size machine like a full-size DreamStation. 

CPAP accessories for travel

There aren’t that many things you need to travel with your CPAP machine.

Erin at Large reader deal: CPAPMasks.com has kindly offered my readers 20% off orders over $75, just use the code ERIN20 at checkout

When you're traveling with sleep apnea, it can feel like a hassle going on holiday. But traveling with a CPAP machine isn't all that difficult. Recommendations for travel CPAP machines, CPAP travel accessories, and more, from someone who HAS sleep apnea. When you're traveling with sleep apnea, it can feel like a hassle going on holiday. But traveling with a CPAP machine isn't all that difficult. Recommendations for travel CPAP machines, CPAP travel accessories, and more, from someone who HAS sleep apnea.
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