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A really good paper airplane book

A really good paper airplane book

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paper airplane book

If you’ve got a small child between 3 and, well, I’m not sure there’s an upper age limit here, paper airplane construction becomes a critical life skill. I wrote about a great online resource for paper airplane plans here, and it’s one of my most popular posts. As my son’s appetite for paper airplanes only grows, I decided to invest in an actual book. The [amazon_link id=”0761143831″ target=”_blank” ]World Record Paper Airplane Book[/amazon_link] is a pretty good one.

Along with plans for many different types of planes, there are pages to cut out that produces really cool looking planes, and a hangar to park them on. There is also many pages of seriously deep information into why each model flies and how, discussions of drag and lift. So if you have an older child who is into Knowing Everything, this is great. You can safely ignore those chapters otherwise.

I particularly liked the troubleshooting tips that go along with each plane model. After you’ve finished following along with the clear diagrams, they provide some help for diving planes, planes that go up quickly and then dive, or veer in a particular direction. This is handy when your child wails, ‘Mummy! This plane DOES NOT WORK.’

What are your best paper airplane resources?

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Paper airplanes everywhere

Paper airplanes everywhere

paper airplanes

Elliot is obsessed with paper airplanes at the minute. Every remotely foldable piece of anything is handed to me: ‘Please make into paper airplane, Mummy?’

I’ve used magazine subscription inserts, construction paper, pages torn from Anthropologie catalogues – anything and everything. My own paper airplane engineering skills were clearly not doing it anymore, so I turned to Google. As you do.

My favourite designs are two from this sitethe Eagle and the High Glider. The High Glider, in particular, is great for the rather non-specific way in which three year olds throw planes. Judicious bits of washi tape hold it together through the many throwings.

What’s your favourite way to fold a paper airplane?

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